Could I be a parish councillor?

The simple answer is yes in most cases, however there are a few rules as you may expect.

As a councillor you can become a voice for your community and affect real change. Councillors are community leaders and represent the aspirations of the public that they serve. Parish and town councils are the most local part of our democratic system and are closest to the public. Why don’t you stand for your local parish or town council and see what difference you can make to your local community?

To qualify as a potential councillor you have to be:

  • a British subject, or a citizen of the Commonwealth or the European Union; and
  • on the “relevant date” (i.e. the day on which you are nominated or if there is a poll the day of the election) 18 years of age or over;

and additionally:

  • on the “relevant day” a local government elector for the council area for which you want to stand; or
  • have during the whole of the 12 months preceding that day occupied as owner or tenant any land or other premises in the council area; or
  • have during that same period had your principal or only place of work in the council area; or
  • during that 12 month period resided in the council area. In the case of a sitting member of a parish or community council you can also satisfy the criteria to be elected if you have lived in the council area or within 3 miles of it for the whole of the 12 months preceding the “relevant day”.

You cannot stand for election if you

  • are subject of a bankruptcy restriction order or interim order.
  • have, within five years before the day of the election, been convicted in the United Kingdom of any offence and have had a sentence of imprisonment (whether suspended or not) for a period of over three months without the option of a fine.
  • you work for the council you want to become a councillor for (but you can work for other local authorities, including the principal authorities that represent the same area).